Links To And Excerpts From The Curbsiders’ #309 USPSTF Quick Update: Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes Screening With Dr. Chien-Wen Tseng With Links To Additional Resources

Here is an infographic from the CDC:

If you have prediabtes, then consider joining:

National Diabetes Prevention Program from the CDC

Why Participate? from the CDC

Research shows that CDC-recognized lifestyle change program participants who lost 5-7% of their body weight and added 150 minutes of exercise per week cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58% (71% for people over 60 years old).

Even a decade later, program participants were one-third less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than individuals who did not join a program.

The program can also lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke, improve your health, help you feel more energetic, and even reverse your prediabetes diagnosis.

In this post, I link to and excerpt from The Curbsiders#309 USPSTF Quick Update: Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes Screening With Dr. Chien-Wen Tseng
DECEMBER 6, 2021 By Dr. PAUL WILLIAMS

All that follows is from the above outstanding resource.

Summary

Sweeten your day with a review of the updated 2021 USPSTF Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes screening guidelines with expert guest Dr. Chien-Wen Tseng! We review the new screening recommendations, assess different testing modalities, talk through screening intervals, and emphasize other risk factors that impact screening!

USPSTF Update: Prediabetes & DM Screening Pearls

  1. The USPSTF recommends screening for prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes in adults ages 35 to 70 who have overweight or obesity.
    1. Defining Adult Overweight & Obesity from the CDC
      1. “Weight that is higher than what is considered healthy for a given height is described as overweight or obesity. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a screening tool for overweight and obesity.”
      2. “BMI is a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters. A high BMI can indicate high body fatness.
      3. “To calculate BMI, see the Adult BMI Calculator or determine BMI by finding your height and weight in this BMI Index Chart
      4. “BMI does not measure body fat directly, but BMI is moderately correlated with more direct measures of body fat obtained from skinfold thickness measurements, bioelectrical impedance, underwater weighing, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and other methods 1,2,3. Furthermore, BMI appears to be strongly correlated with various adverse health outcomes consistent with these more direct measures of body fatness 4,5,6,7,8,9.”
    2. Prediabetes – Your Chance to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes from the CDC.
    3. Diabetes Tests from the CDC.
      1. Result* A1C Test Fasting Blood Sugar Test Glucose Tolerance Test Random Blood Sugar Test
        Diabetes 6.5% or above 126 mg/dL or above 200 mg/dL or above 200 mg/dL or above
        Prediabetes 5.7 – 6.4% 100 – 125 mg/dL 140 – 199 mg/dL  N/A
        Normal Below 5.7% 99 mg/dL or below 140 mg/dL or below  N/A
      2. “If your doctor thinks you have type 1 diabetes, your blood may also tested for autoantibodies (substances that indicate your body is attacking itself) that are often present in type 1 diabetes but not in type 2 diabetes. You may have your urine tested for ketones (produced when your body burns fat for energy), which also indicate type 1 diabetes instead of type 2 diabetes.”
  2. One of the biggest changes from the 2015 recommendation is lowering the age of screening initiation from 40 years old to 35 years old.
  3. Screening can be completed with one of the following: 1) Hemoglobin A1c 2) Fasting glucose 3) Glucose tolerance test.
  4. If initial screening is normal, a reasonable interval for repeat screening is 3 years.
  5. Screening should be considered at a lower BMI >23 for Asian American patients and at an earlier age if the patient is from a population with a disproportionately high prevalence of diabetes.

National Diabetes Prevention Program from the CDC

Why Participate? from the CDC

Research shows that CDC-recognized lifestyle change program participants who lost 5-7% of their body weight and added 150 minutes of exercise per week cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58% (71% for people over 60 years old).

Even a decade later, program participants were one-third less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than individuals who did not join a program.

The program can also lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke, improve your health, help you feel more energetic, and even reverse your prediabetes diagnosis.

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